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Chicken Cacciatore – Pollo alla Cacciatora

Chicken Cacciatore – Pollo alla Cacciatora

Chicken Cacciatore is undoubtedly one of the most well-known dishes of Italian cuisine abroad. For sure, it is one of the most common during Sunday lunches in Italy, above all in the central and northern regions. I have tried for a long time to understand the region of origin of this tasty and juicy dish but I came to realize it is not really clear where it comes from! Infact the recipe admits many variants depending on who’s cooking for you and where!  I find this pretty interesting as you might think you know what to expect and then you get a small  – or major surprise, whether you eat this in my region, or you go to Emilia-Romagna, or Toscana.

I thought for example that carrots and celery were necessary, and instead I saw people cooking it just with onions many times! And can you imagine, a friend of mine puts anchovies and olives in the sauce…talking about this last one, you can prepare it with tomato paste, fresh tomatoes, and so on.

What is sure is that Chicken cacciatore – like most italian dishes – is strictly connected to the peasant tradition and one element that characterizes it is the use of aromatic herbs. Rosemary is infact of key importance for this preparation, together with the pratice of adding white or red wine during the cooking.

Chicken Cacciatore

 

Simple ingredients, simple preparation that will make a great impression on your table though! A rich and aromatic sauce embracing tender chicken, who can resist?

To give a little insight on the name of the dish, I can tell you that – and I am sure many of you already know this – cacciatore means “hunter” and in the culinary field it indicates something prepared “hunter-style” usually meaning by sauteeing onions, vegetables with herbs, and then proceeed by simmering with wine and adding tomatoes. You can make chicken cacciatore, but for example, you can also make rabbit cacciatore!

 

And now let’s see what we need!

 

Chicken cacciatore recipe

Ingredients

1 chicken (with skin) cut in pieces
17 oz (500 gr) crushed tomatoes
1 big carrot, chopped
1 clove of garlic
1 celery stalk, chopped
1 onion, chopped
2 or 3 sprigs of rosemary
a glass of red or white wine
2 tbsp extra-virgin olive oil
salt and pepper

 

Method

In a large and deep pot, heat the olive oil for a couple of minutes until sizzling. Add the  chopped carrot, onion and celery and the garlic cloves  – I leave these last ones whole so I take them out at the end, but you can choose whether you want to crush them. Drop the rosemary sprigs in the pan and cook over medium heat for around 10 minutes, until the vegetables are wilted and golden.

Chicken Cacciatore

At this point add the chicken – cut in pieces, with the skin on it – and cook for a couple of minutes to brown the surface on all sides.

Chicken Cacciatore

Add wine and over high flame let it evaporate.   At this point, add salt and pepper,  stir a bit and pour the tomatoes on the chicken. Reduce the flame and let the sauce simmer for around 35 minutes – better if covered.  Remember to stir from time to time and taste the sauce to define whether it needs more salt or not.

Chicken Cacciatore

When it’s ready,remove from heat and if you want, sprinkle fresh parsley all over (I didn’t do it).

Serve warm, together with some casereccio (homemade) bread…and dream.

Chicken Cacciatore

If you are into chicken, don’t miss these special chicken  cutlets Sicilian-style as well!

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Chicken Cacciatore - Pollo alla cacciatora

2017-12-07
: 4
: 15 min
: 50 min
: 1 hr 5 min
: easy

Chicken Cacciatore is an Italian classic, easy to make, and it admits many variants! Very juicy and tasty it features a rich sauce and tender chicken bites.

By:

Ingredients
  • 1 chicken (with skin) cut in pieces
  • 500 gr crushed tomatoes
  • 1 big carrot, chopped
  • 1 clove of garlic
  • 1 celery stalk, chopped
  • 1 onion, chopped
  • 2 or 3 sprigs of rosemary
  • a glass of red or white wine
  • 2 tbsp extra-virgin olive oil
  • salt and pepper
Directions
  • Step 1 In a large and deep pot, heat the olive oil for a couple of minutes until sizzling.
  • Step 2 Add the  chopped carrot, onion and celery and the garlic cloves  – I leave these last ones whole so I take them out at the end, but you can choose whether you want to crush them.
  • Step 3 Drop the rosemary sprigs in the pan and cook over medium heat for around 10 minutes, until the vegetables are wilted and golden. At this point add the chicken – cut in pieces, with the skin on it – and cook for a couple of minutes to brown the surface on all sides.
  • Step 4 Add wine and over high flame let it evaporate. 
  • Step 5 At this point, add salt and pepper,  stir a bit and pour the tomatoes on the chicken.
  • Step 6 Reduce the flame and let the sauce simmer for around 35 minutes – better if covered. 
  • Step 7 Remember to stir from time to time and taste the sauce to define whether it needs more salt or not.
  • Step 8 When it’s ready,remove from heat and if you want, sprinkle fresh parsley all over (I didn’t do it).
  • Step 9 Serve warm, together with some casereccio (homemade) bread…and dream.

 

 

 



3 thoughts on “Chicken Cacciatore – Pollo alla Cacciatora”

  • I have not commented here in quite a while (actually since my one and only). That is not because I have been inattentive; on the contrary, I follow this religiously. But if you are happy with what you see and you have no ability to add to it, there is no need to say anything. The signorina remains faithful to her vision for this blog, present simple (but exquisite) food and its preparation for anyone to see. And anyone who has worked with food knows that “simple food” is not easy. Kudos to her for making it accessible. This blog exemplifies a notion articulated by Antoine De Saint-Exupery and one of the more profound statements made anywhere. He wrote: “In anything at all, perfection is finally attained not when there is no longer anything to add, but when there is no longer anything to take away.” Again: Brava, Signorina!

    • Hi Jack! Can words express how much I am thankful for your words? I am not sure. YOu should see the smile on my face right now!
      You also quote De Saint-Exupery, whom I love, talking about something that concerns me. I am so glad that what I do is appreciated, and for sure my goal is to make Italian cooking accessible 🙂
      Thank you again, from the heart!

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